Archive for the ‘Communication’ Category

Astute comments from comics

July 7, 2009

Last week I read and was moved by Joe Sacco’s engagingly intense graphic novel “Palestine”. It chronicles Sacco’s travels throughout the the area known as Palestine- the west bank and Gaza. He meet with a number of Palestinans, listening to them and documenting their stories from during the time of the second intifada (around 1993). Unfortunately, I found that his experiences and stories concur with my own experiences – from the time that served in the IDF in the West Bank in the mid-late 70s and from the period of the first intifada (1988) when I was wondering around the same towns that I had served as a soldier, only this time as an artist and witness. I say unfortunate because it is a tragedy of epic proportions- each side making blunder after horrible blunder, enslaving each other to oppression, hate, pain and bloodshed.
One encounter in Sacco’s book that I was deeply touched by occured towards the end of the book In it he recollects a meeting with several people- Israeli Jews, Palestinians, Americans and Europeans. One Israeli is quoted as saying that one state or two states does not matter. What does it matter if the racism of one state oppresses the other. What is important, he says, is if the different peoples there can simply learn to live with each other. A wise comment, almost Buddhist in nature- can we manage to let go of our personal pains and learn to live with each other even with our differences.

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Internet Town Hall

December 8, 2008

Last Saturday, I attended a town hall meeting sponsored by www.internetforeveryone.org/. This was the first or second of a series of national meetings to gather data about internet accessibility in order to assist the government in setting a responsible, comprehensive policy for web access for everyone.

There were a bit over 100 people in a downtown hotel with an interesting demographic. 97% of the people there already had access to the web (that is how most people heard of the meeting). Most of the attendees were men, with the main ethic groups being white and African-American. This became important because as the meeting and discussions progressed, the majority opinion was that there should be a partnership between government, local communities and corporations to provide internet access to all, especially the under- served communities (rural, minority, low-income). This means two things- that the initiatives of the large telecom companies such as ATT and Verizon to control and charge for broadband access need to be held in check and monitored, but also that the communities who most need access were actually under-represented. There were several speakers and videos shown at the meeting who were interesting, but did not present anything that really added to the conversation. The exception was a 13-year old Latina girl who spoke about the problems of not having internet access, especially in relation to her studies and the lack of future opportunities that are created by this lack of access.

We broke into groups and discussed open internet, innovation, budgets and who should be responsible for development and maintenance of internet technologies, access to computers (such as the One-Laptop-Per-Child initiative. These are important conversations that need to be happening across the country, but with a more diverse set of attendees to better represent the constituents and users. We (USA) were once on top of development and usage of these technologies, but we have fallen behind Europe and Asia. Perhaps we should look out for more and better inspiration and guidance for our own policies.

One final note about the meeting. I learned that supposedly, several years ago the LADWP laid fiber optic cable throughout the city of L.A. to provide broadband internet access to everyone. But it remains dark, primarily because of the lobbies of the telecom companies and internet providers because it will cut down on their revenue. Hmmm- data and knowledge for everybody that can only assist the nation (and corporations), or continuing to keep large profits for a few while limiting our ability to provide work and opportunities for the masses. Perhaps I have missed something.