Links

I have been working on a web project of images and stories of two extended periods that I spent in Israel. One was during the mid-late 1970’s when served in the infantry of the Israeli army.  The second is when I returned in 1988, first  to be an artist-in-residence at a small town in the north, doing art with Jewish, Moslem, Christian and Druze children and then to paint in Jerusalem. This was during the first Intifada so I also spent a bit of time traveling around the West Bank, meeting up with Palestinians to listen to and learn about their stories and culture. This work in progress can be found here:
www.golemgrafica.com/photo_1.htm#

The links below are three very impressive talks that have been podcast from the TED conference (the descriptive text is theirs).

Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining (and profoundly moving) case for creating an education system that nurtures creativity, rather than undermining it. With ample anecdotes and witty asides, Robinson points out the many ways our schools fail to recognize — much less cultivate — the talents of many brilliant people. “We are educating people out of their creativity,” Robinson says. The universality of his message is evidenced by its rampant popularity online. A typical review: “If you have not yet seen Sir Ken Robinson’s TED talk, please stop whatever you’re doing and watch it now.”
http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/66

Neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor had an opportunity few brain scientists would wish for: One morning, she realized she was having a massive stroke. As it happened — as she felt her brain functions slip away one by one, speech, movement, understanding — she studied and remembered every moment. This is a powerful story about how our brains define us and connect us to the world and to one another.
http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/view/id/229

In this soaring demonstration, deaf percussionist Evelyn Glennie leads the audience through an exploration of music not as notes on a page, but as an expression of the human experience. Playing with sensitivity and nuance informed by a soul-deep understanding of and connection to music, she talks about a music that is more than sound waves perceived by the human ear. She illustrates a richer picture that begins with listening to yourself, and includes emotion and intent as well as the complex role of physical spaces — instrument, concert hall and even the bones and body cavities of musician and listener alike.
http://www.ted.com/talks/view/id/103

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